Current Projects

EDSAC manufacture in Cambridge

In recreating the EDSAC computer, a surprising amount of mechanical engineering is required. EDSAC engineering was originally done by hand, but for the EDSAC Replica Project modern Computer Aided Design is being deployed.

Origins of the EDSAC Replica Project

In January 2013 the EDSAC Replica Project trustees management committee met at Teversham Engineering where they saw the first replica chassis come off the production facility. They also spoke to camera about their reasons for supporting the project.

WITCH recognised by Guinness World Records

The Harwell Dekatron / WITCH computer has been recognised by Guinness World Records as the world's oldest original working digital computer.

Production begins on recreation of EDSAC

This week sees the production of the first replica components for the recreation of EDSAC, the computer that 63 years ago made general purpose computing available to users for the first time.

First EDSAC Replica chassis metalwork

EDSAC was essentially modular and consisted of 12 vertical racks, each holding up to 14 individual horizontal chassis. Only three original chassis have survived, so new ones have had to be commissioned.

The Video of the Reboot

Twenty minute video of the reboot of the world's oldest working digital computer, the Harwell Dekatron / WITCH.

Restoration complete!

The world's oldest original working digital computer springs back into action at TNMOC

ICL System 25 restoration during 2012

The ICL System 25 from 1980/81 was a flexible small office computer system and the successor to ICL System Ten, neither of which had operating systems or executive.

Harwell Dekatron / WITCH restoration during 2012

The Harwell Dekatron computer was used at Harwell from 1951-57 and then won by Wolverhampton College, renamed the WITCH and used for teaching computing until 1973.

ICL 2966 restoration during 2012

The ICL 2966 mainframe is the largest and most power-hungry system on display at TNMOC. It was used between 1985 and 1999 by TARMAC and is thought to be the last operational 2900 in the UK.

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