Project Team

Delwyn Holroyd has worked in the computer industry for 20 years and has a degree in electronic engineering. His early career was in the mainframe division at ICL, before moving into the fields of non-linear editing and compositing for television and feature film. He is now technical director and co-founder of a company manufacturing digital recording equipment for professional cinematography cameras.

Delwyn became a volunteer at TNMOC in 2009 and is currently chairman of the Volunteers Association. He has been closely involved in the restoration of the electronics in the Harwell Dekatron computer and is also leader of the ICL 2966 and Cray Y-MP EL restoration projects at TNMOC. His other activities in the field of computer history include a Sinclair ZX Spectrum emulator for mobile phones and, in conjunction with David Holdsworth, an emulator for ICL's George 3 operating system.



Johan Iversen has worked in the computer industry for more than 30 years and has a degree in electronics and computing. His early career was in the Customer Engineering Division (CED) at ICL repairing mini-computers, namely the System Ten (the forerunner to the System25), before moving into Software Development.

Johan became a volunteer at TNMOC in 2008 and is currently vice-chairman of the Volunteers Association. He has been closely involved in the restoration of the electronics in the Harwell Dekatron computer and he is also leader of the System 25 restoration project at TNMOC.





Eddie Washington worked in the telecommunications industry for 30 years, joining the GPO (the then combined postal and telecomunications provider in the UK) in 1966 as a Trainee Technician Apprentice. He went on to become a maintenance engineer looking after electro-mechanical telephone exchanges in North London and ended his career in BT as an Executive Engineer.

Eddie became a volunteer at TNMOC in 2009 after hearing through the BT grapevine that an organisation on Bletchley Park urgently needed High Speed Relays – three boxes of which he just happened to have in his loft. His first role was in assisting the Tunny group with the adjustments and timings of the Post Office 3000 type relays and Uniselectors during the final commissioning stages of the Tunny Machine. He was then asked to join the newly forming WITCH Restoration Team in September 2009.



Tony Frazer became interested in electronics at junior school, where he earned extra pocket money by fixing germanium transistor radios. He started the school's Electronics Club and became interested in building electronic gadgets.

Tony became involved in computing in 1980, writing BASIC programs (and playing games like STTR1, KINGDM, OXO) on a Data Dynamics 390 teleprinter connected by acoustic coupler to the Open University Computing Service in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He studied Chemistry, but his first job was developing and running software for the finance department of a bank. In the 1990s, he "defected" from the ranks of mainframe developer having seen VB3 running on a PC. He went on to develop a graphical Time Management system in his spare time, which got him started developing front ends for Access and Oracle databases. He now works as a database developer doing 'stuff' in Oracle and SQL Server.